The 10 minute drill is an intense workout that will keep you working for an entire 10 minutes, as opposed to all the resting done in a typical workout. 

As an example of the typical workout, I might do a set of chest press, which will take maybe 25 seconds to complete.  After that set, I would rest for 30-90 seconds before performing another set.  Repeating that for 3-5 sets, I would then move on to another exercise.  The ratios may change with circuits or super sets, but most people still get a ton of resting time in any given 10 minutes of their workout.  Contrast that with the 10 minute drill, where 10 minutes means 10 minutes -- or maybe more! 

Allow me to explain...

Let's start by picking 4 exercises, and just for fun, let's make them 4 different body parts.  Let's use push ups, seated rows, body weight squats, and sit ups.  Now the number of reps and the amount of time spent doing each thing doesn't really matter.  What matters, is that you keep moving for the entire 10 minutes.  When you transition from one exercise to the next, you need to transition as quickly as possible. You do get penalized for your "slack time," meaning the time it takes you to transition between exercises accumulates until the 10 minutes is over.  Whatever slack time has accumulated must be made up on something hard, like a manual treadmill or a high resistance stationary bike. 

Let's look at an example. Let's say you did the following:

0:00 - 1:20 > Push ups

1:20 - 1:32 > Transition time (total slack time = 0:12)

1:32 - 3:05 > Seated row

3:05 - 3:16 > Transition (total slack time = 0:23)

3:16 - 4:48 > Squats

4:48 - 4:56 > Transition (total slack time = 0:31)

4:56 - 6:33 > Push ups

6:33 - 6:36 > Transition (total slack time = 0:34)

6:36 - 8:01 > Sit ups

8:01 - 8:17 > Transition (total slack time = 0:50)

8:17 - 8:55 > Squats

8: 55 - 9:03 > Transition (total slack time = 0:58)

9:03 -10:00 > Seated row

10:00-10:14 > Transition (total slack time = 1:12)

10:14-11:26 > Manual treadmill

This is an example - you can set up the transitions in whatever way works best for your strategy and your fatigue level.  Note that the order was not the same the second time around.  That's okay, the order doesn't matter.  You may change up the order for faster transitions.  For example, it may take 10-12 seconds to get off the ground after sit ups and get onto the seated row machine, but it might only take 1-2 seconds to roll over and start doing push ups.  It's even fair game to go back and fourth between those two exercises a couple of times to save on the slack time.  You can arrange the order in any way you need to cut down excessive slack time. 

The idea isn't to do a lot of the manual treadmill (or whatever the penalty exercise is), the idea is to maximize that 10 minutes.  In the example, out of 11 minutes and 26 seconds, 1 minute and 12 seconds of it were slack time.  This means that 10 minutes and 14 seconds were actual work time ... a whopping 89.5% of the workout time was spent actually working out!  In a typical workout (with typical rest periods) it may take 30 or 40 minutes to do the same amount of work.  Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying there's anything wrong with doing workouts that require rest periods.  I just want to introduce you do alternative workout styles.

The easiest way to do the 10 minute drill is with a friend. You'll need two stop watches going at once.  One to count the 10 minutes (this one never stops once it starts) and one to count up the slack time (press start when one exercise is finished and let it run until the next one starts -- make sure not to press clear!)  If you don't have a friend with you, you can just use one stop watch and assume every transition is 10 seconds.

The easiest way to do this workout is with a friend.

Maybe you time your friend for a round, then s/he times you.  You'll need two stop watches going at once.  One to count the 10 minutes (this one never stops once it starts) and one to count up the slack time (press start when one exercise is finished and let it run until the next one starts -- make sure not to press clear!)  If you don't have a friend with you, you can just use one stop watch and assume every transition is 10 seconds.  Another alternative if you don't have a friend is not to time the transitions, count them and require one repetition of a penalty exercise (I like burpees in this case) for each transition.  For instance, in the above example, there were 7 transitions meaning I would have to do 7 burpees at the end of my 10 minutes.

Try this workout and let me know what you think!